Childhood Environments - Asthma

"Asthma is a common chronic disease among children in the United States.

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  • In 2006, 9.9 million children under 18 years of age were reported to have ever been diagnosed with asthma; 6.8 million children had an asthmatic episode in the last 12 months.
  • The hospitalization rate for asthma remained at 27 per 10,000 children from 2002-2004.
  • Asthma is the third ranking cause of non-injury related hospitalization among children less than 15 years of age.
  • Although asthma deaths among children are rare, 195 children under 18 years of age died from asthma in 2003."

 

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.epa.gov/children/childrens-environmental-health-facts#asthma

Seasonal Allergies?

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"Allergic rhinitis occurs when allergens in the air are breathed by a patient that is allergic to them, irritating and inflaming the nasal passages. Allergens may include dust mites, pollen, molds, or pet dander. In people who are allergic to them, these particles trigger the release of a chemical in the body that causes nasal congestion, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose. These symptoms can lead to poor sleep, which can result in significant daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

Allergic rhinitis (allergies) may occur year-round or seasonally. When it occurs seasonally it is usually caused by airborne particles from trees, grass, ragweed, or outdoor mold. Causes of year-round allergic rhinitis include indoor substances such as pet dander, indoor mold, cockroach and dust mites in bedding, mattresses, and carpeting."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/sleep-related-problems/allergic-rhinitis-and-sleep

Melatonin Help!

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"The pattern of waking during the day when it is light and sleeping at night when it is dark is a natural part of human life. Only recently have scientists begun to understand the alternating cycle of sleep and waking, and how it is related to daylight and darkness.

A key factor in how human sleep is regulated is exposure to light or to darkness. Exposure to light stimulates a nerve pathway from the retina in the eye to an area in the brain called the hypothalamus. There, a special center called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) initiates signals to other parts of the brain that control hormones, body temperature and other functions that play a role in making us feel sleepy or wide awake."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/melatonin-and-sleep

Need More Sleep?

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"Do you know  how much sleep we really need ? What about how much sleep your child needs? Sleep needs vary with age, but generally speaking, young children need around 11 to 12 hours each night, teens need between 8.5 and 9.25 hours and the average adult needs only between seven and nine hours per night. Of course, getting your child to enjoy the recommended hours of sleep each evening is often difficult."

To find out how to add sleep to your child's schedule, please click on the link below!

https://sleepfoundation.org/ask-the-expert/how-can-my-child-get-more-sleep

Bedwetting

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"Nocturnal enuresis is the medical term for bedwetting. Most children wet the bed occasionally or even nightly during the potty-training years. In fact, it is estimated that seven million children in the United States wet their beds on a regular basis. Controlling bladder function during sleep is usually the last stage of potty-training. In others words, it is normal for children to wet the bed while sleeping during that learning process. Bedwetting is typically not even considered to be a problem until after age 7.

Bedwetting in children is often simply a result of immaturity. The age at which children become able to control their bladders during sleep is variable. Bladder control is a complex process that involves coordinated action of the muscles, nerves, spinal cord and brain. In this case, the problem will resolve in time. On the other hand, it may be an indication of an underlying medical condition, such as obstruction of the urinary tract. If bedwetting persists beyond the age of 6 or 7, you should consult your pediatrician."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/bedwetting-and-sleep