Stomach Pains

"Almost all children have abdominal pain at one time or another. Abdominal pain is pain in the stomach or belly area. It can be anywhere between the chest and groin.

Most of the time, it is not caused by a serious medical problem. But sometimes abdominal pain can be a sign of something serious. Learn when you should seek medical care right away for your child with abdominal pain.

Considerations

When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain:

  • Generalized pain or pain over more than half of the belly. Your child can have this kind of pain when they have a stomach virus, indigestion, gas, or when they become constipated.
  • Cramp-like pain is likely to be due to gas and bloating. It is often followed by diarrhea. It is usually not serious.
  • Colicky pain is pain that comes in waves, usually starts and ends suddenly, and is often severe.
  • Localized pain is pain in only one area of the belly. Your child may be having problems with their appendix, gallbladder, a hernia (twisted bowel), ovary, testicles, or stomach (ulcers)."

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007504.htm

Learning about Eczema

"Adults also have eczema, but it usually appears in the first six months to five years of a child’s life. In fact, as many as 10% of all infants have some form of eczema. There are a few different types of this condition that your infant, toddler, or child can develop, but the most common one is called atopic dermatitis (AD).

Eczema, including atopic dermatitis, may look and act very differently as your child gets older. It’s important to understand which type of eczema they may have and also their symptoms and triggers, so that you can better treat and manage it as they grow and change. The only way to be sure what your child has, is to make an appointment with your doctor."

For more information, please click on the link listed below!

https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/child-eczema/

Prenatal Care

"What is prenatal care?

Prenatal care is the health care you get while you are pregnant. Take care of yourself and your baby by:

  • Getting early prenatal care. If you know you're pregnant, or think you might be, call your doctor to schedule a visit.
  • Getting regular prenatal care. Your doctor will schedule you for many checkups over the course of your pregnancy. Don't miss any — they are all important.
  • Following your doctor's advice.

Why do I need prenatal care?

Prenatal care can help keep you and your baby healthy. Babies of mothers who do not get prenatal care are three times more likely to have a low birth weight and five times more likely to die than those born to mothers who do get care.

Doctors can spot health problems early when they see mothers regularly. This allows doctors to treat them early. Early treatment can cure many problems and prevent others. Doctors also can talk to pregnant women about things they can do to give their unborn babies a healthy start to life."

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/prenatal-care

 

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder

"Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), or Heller's syndrome, is a rare pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) which involves regression of developmental ability in language, social function and motor skills. It is a devastating condition of unknown cause.

PDDs are a spectrum of behavioural problems associated with autism and autism-like syndromes. They include CDD, Rett's Syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder - not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). CDD is considered a low-functioning form of autistic spectrum disorder. However, autism does not show the severe regression after several years of normal development which characterises CDD, and children with CDD show a more dramatic loss of skills compared with children with autism. CDD also tends to develop later than autism, and can develop very much later (up to the age of 10 years)."

For more information, please click on the link below! 

https://patient.info/doctor/childhood-disintegrative-disorder-hellers-syndrome

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

"Pertussis (whooping cough) can cause serious illness in babies, children, teens, and adults. Symptoms of pertussis usually develop within 5 to 10 days after being exposed, but sometimes not for as long as 3 weeks.

The disease usually starts with cold-like symptoms and maybe a mild cough or fever. In babies, the cough can be minimal or not even there. Babies may have a symptom known as "apnea." Apnea is a pause in the child's breathing pattern. Pertussis is most dangerous for babies. About half of babies younger than 1 year who get the disease need care in the hospital. Learn more about pertussis complications.

Early symptoms can last for 1 to 2 weeks and usually include:

  • Runny nose
  • Low-grade fever (generally minimal throughout the course of the disease)
  • Mild, occasional cough
  • Apnea – a pause in breathing (in babies)

Because pertussis in its early stages appears to be nothing more than the common cold, it is often not suspected or diagnosed until the more severe symptoms appear."