Seasonal Allergies

"Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms — the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose — have something to do with the recent weather change. If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you're likely right: seasonal allergies are at work.

Seasonal allergies, sometimes called "hay fever" or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, usually when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants.

Healthy Tips for Kids

PHYSICAL:

ENERGY

It is important to understand and make healthy choices about when to eat, how much to
eat, and the types of food and drinks to provide the body with the most useful energy.

PLAY

A variety of energizing play can help the body stay strong, lean and fit, and be fun in
the process. Sleep and other forms of “re-charging” allow one to engage in play on a
daily basis.

Poison Prevention Tips

Each year, approximately 3 million people – many under age 5 – swallow or have contact with a poisonous substance. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers tips in both English and Spanish to prevent and to treat exposures to poison. Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print, online or broadcast story, with acknowledgement of source. The AAP also has tips on poison treatments. 

USDA Dietary Guidelines for Children

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If we are what we eat, then American kids are Fritos. That’s just one of the major findings from the new USDA Dietary Guidelines. Fries and chips are the only “vegetables” on the list of top 25 calorie sources; fruit juice is the sole “fruit” to make the leaderboard.

The prevalence of these foods plays a big role in the childhood-obesity epidemic, which affects far more than our children’s waist sizes. Many chronic conditions are on the rise among kids, including asthma, allergies, diabetes, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). And all of these conditions have been linked to what kids eat. Improving children’s diets in the following three areas that were addressed in the report would go a long way toward helping our kids stay healthy:

Go low when it comes to salt. Most kids over 2 consume too much sodium, which can lead to high blood pressure. White bread is kids’ biggest source of salt because they eat so much of it. Excess sodium is also hidden in many processed, frozen, and restaurant foods. The fix: Go with low-sodium whole grains when choosing bread. Eat at home more often, and choose fresh foods over frozen or processed products.

Get off the SoFAS! This acronym may be the next buzzword in the childhood obesity discussion. SoFAS—“solid fats and added sugars”—make up a whopping 35 percent of our calories and have almost no nutritional value. These unhealthy fats, which are solid at room temperature, are found mostly in butter, stick margarine, and red meat. That means they’re in many children’s-menu staples: pizza, hot dogs, bacon, French fries, and desserts. The fix: Whenever possible, avoid these foods and use oils to replace solid fats when cooking.

Watch the added sugars. Sugars are healthy in whole foods like fruits and milk because these foods also contain nutrients that signal the body to use the sugar correctly. But when they are added to nutritionally empty foods (like many desserts), the natural process is thrown off. The fix: Make sweets an occasional treat in your family. Most important: View these findings as a road map to dietary change. Your children’s health depends on it.

Alan Greene, M.D. is a pediatrician and the author of the bestselling Raising Baby Green. He lives in Danville, CA.

Source credit https://www.parenting.com/article/usda-dietary-guidelines-children

 

Signs your Baby Might have a Vision Problem

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It takes your baby's eyes some time to adjust to the world, so at first they might not always look or function the way you expect.

For example, it's perfectly normal in the first three months of life for your infant's eyes to be crossed, or for him not to be able to see much past your face when you're holding him.

Certain signs could indicate a problem. Talk with your baby's doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • Your baby's eyes don't move normally. One moves and the other doesn't, for example, or one looks different from the other when moving.
  • Your baby is older than 1 month, but lights, mobiles, and other distractions still don't catch his attention.
  • One of your baby's eyes never opens.
  • Your baby has a persistent, unusual spot in her eyes in photos taken with a flash. Instead of the common red-eye caused by camera flash, for example, there's a white spot.
  • You notice white, grayish-white, or yellow material in the pupil of your baby's eye. (His eyes look cloudy.)
  • One (or both) of your baby's eyes is bulging.
  • One or both of your baby's eyelids seem to be drooping.
  • Your baby squints often.
  • Your baby rubs her eyes often when she's not sleepy.
  • Your baby's eyes seem sensitive to light.
  • One of your baby's eyes is bigger than the other, or the pupils are different sizes.
  • You notice any other change in his eyes from how they usually look.

In addition, once your baby is 3 months old, talk with the doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • Your baby's eyes turn way in or out, and stay that way.
  • Your baby's eyes don't follow a toy moved from side to side in front of her.
  • Your baby's eyes seem to jump or wiggle back and forth.
  • Your baby seems to consistently tilt his head when he looks at things.

You'll also want to have the doctor check your baby's eyes if they show any signs of a blocked tear duct or infection, such as pinkeye. These signs include excessive tearing, redness that lasts more than a few days, or pus or crust in her eyes.

Your baby's doctor can help you determine whether you should be concerned. The doctor may examine your child's eyes, screen his vision, or refer you to a medical eye specialist (ophthalmologist). If vision problems run in your baby's family, be sure to mention it.

Source credit https://www.babycenter.com/0_red-flags-signs-that-your-baby-may-have-a-vision-problem_1439840.bc