Tips for Halloween

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Halloween is a fun time of year for all ages. However, here are some tips to make it a safe holiday!

ON THE TRICK-OR-TREAT TRAIL:

A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children on their neighborhood rounds.

Have flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.

If your older children are going alone, plan and review the route that is acceptable to you. Agree on a specific time when they should return home.

Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.

Because pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween, remind Trick-or-Treaters:

Stay in a group and communicate where they will be going.

Remember reflective tape for costumes and trick-or-treat bags.

Carry a cellphone for quick communication.

Remain on well-lit streets and always use the sidewalk.

If no sidewalk is available, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.

Never cut across yards or use alleys.

Only cross the street as a group in established crosswalks (as recognized by local custom). Never cross between parked cars or out of driveways.

Don't assume the right of way. Motorists may have trouble seeing Trick-or-Treaters. Just because one car stops, doesn't mean others will!

Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity.

HEALTHY HALLOWEEN:

A good meal prior to parties and trick-or-treating will discourage youngsters from filling up on Halloween treats.

Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils.

Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.

Try to ration treats for the days and weeks following Halloween.

HALLOWEEN AND FOOD ALLERGIES:

Halloween can be tricky for children with food allergies. It's important that parents closely examine Halloween candy to avoid a potentially life-threatening reaction: 

Always read the ingredient label on treats. Many popular Halloween candies contain some of the most common allergens, such as peanuts or tree nuts, milk, egg, soy or wheat.

If the ingredients aren't listed, arrange for a treat "exchange" with classmates or friends. Or, bag up the goodies your child can't eat because of an allergy and leave them with a note asking the "Treat Fairy" to swap them for a prize.

Be aware that even if they are not listed on the ingredient label, candy is at high risk of containing trace amounts of common allergy triggers, because factories often produce many different products. Also, "fun size" or miniature candies may have different ingredients or be made on different equipment than the regular size candies, meaning that brands your child previously ate without problems could cause a reaction.

Teach your child to politely turn down home-baked items such as cupcakes and brownies, and never to taste or share another child's food.

Source Credit:

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Halloween-Safety-Tips.aspx